unhistorical:

Interviewer: But the question is more, how do you get there? Do you get there by confrontation, violence?

Davis: Oh, is that the question you were asking? Yeah see, that’s another thing. When you talk about a revolution, most people think violence, without realizing that the real content of any revolutionary thrust lies in the principles and the goals that you’re striving for, not in the way you reach them. On the other hand, because of the way this society’s organized, because of the violence that exists on the surface everywhere, you have to expect that there are going to be such explosions. You have to expect things like that as reactions. If you are a black person and live in the black community all your life and walk out on the street everyday seeing white policemen surrounding you… when I was living in Los Angeles, for instance, long before the situation in L.A ever occurred, I was constantly stopped. No, the police didn’t know who I was. But I was a black women and I had a natural and they, I suppose thought I might be “militant.”

And when you live under a situation like that constantly, and then you ask me, you know, whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all. Whether I approve of guns.

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama. Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs, bombs that were planted by racists. I remember, from the time I was very small, I remember the sounds of bombs exploding across the street. Our house shaking. I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times, because of the fact that, at any moment, we might expect to be attacked. The man who was, at that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bull Connor, would often get on the radio and make statements like, “Niggers have moved into a white neighborhood. We better expect some bloodshed tonight.” And sure enough, there would be bloodshed. After the four young girls who lived, one of them lived next door to me…I was very good friends with the sister of another one. My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class. My mother—in fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of one of the young girls called my mother and said, “Can you take me down to the church to pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.” And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place. And then, after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again.

Angela Davis on violence and revolution (1972)

(via meatgloves)

2damnfeisty:

ursula-theseabitch:

So you telling me that the U.S has completely cured the American doctor with Ebola in 26 days and he’s being released today. While Africa has been dealing with it since the 70’s and they are still looking for a cure.

image

Are we surprised?

(via meatgloves)

piddlebucket:

thisiswhiteprivilege:

softboycollective:

TUESDAY 8/19: Ferguson PD presented a table full of fabricated evidence at this morning’s press conference - allegedly seized from protestors and stopped cars. The Colt 45 Molotov with a white bandana was the crowning glory, turns out you can’t even buy glass 40’s in Missouri. Stay classy, FPD

I seriously think white supremacist are coming in the area to frame the protesters, but it could just be the cops

Nah I think that’s exactly what’s going on.

(via loganmirto)

haythamkenwagron:

I wonder what would happen if there was a protest, where the protesters bring nothing. No signs on wood that could potentially be a weapon, nothing. What would happen if they just massed together in silence and just stood there. No screaming, no violent intent.

I wonder what the police would do.

This.

hipnerd:

Here are some police arresting a reporter in Ferguson, Mo.
Notice anything missing? That’s right, they took off their badges and name tags that had their ID numbers on them.
This is not an isolated incident. When Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery and Ryan Reilly of the Huffington Post were arrested last week for failing to leave a McDonald’s quickly enough, no badges or name tags were visible on the officers who arrested them. Additionally, they were denied that information even though they repeatedly asked for it.
This way the police can act with near impunity and have zero accountability to the people they purportedly protect. The fact that these men are claiming the powers of the police without a shred of the accountability we demand of those in power is terrifying.
White reporters have gotten just a taste of what that is like. Imagine how the black residents who live there — far away from the glare of the cameras — feel, day after day.

hipnerd:

Here are some police arresting a reporter in Ferguson, Mo.

Notice anything missing? That’s right, they took off their badges and name tags that had their ID numbers on them.

This is not an isolated incident. When Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery and Ryan Reilly of the Huffington Post were arrested last week for failing to leave a McDonald’s quickly enough, no badges or name tags were visible on the officers who arrested them. Additionally, they were denied that information even though they repeatedly asked for it.

This way the police can act with near impunity and have zero accountability to the people they purportedly protect. The fact that these men are claiming the powers of the police without a shred of the accountability we demand of those in power is terrifying.

White reporters have gotten just a taste of what that is like. Imagine how the black residents who live there — far away from the glare of the cameras — feel, day after day.

kingjaffejoffer:

laughing at how CNN went into one of the looted businesses in Ferguson and spoke to the owner. the reporter started asking all these leading questions that were clearly setting up answers that expressed anger that their businesses were broken into. 

The owner was like “actually I just want justice for Mike Brown im not worried about material things”

postracialcomments:

Ferguson City Councilwoman Kim Tihen

One officer, Kim Tihen, allegedly “struck [Davis] in his head with a closed fist and hit [him] in the head with handcuffs.

Officer Tihen, for her part, is no longer with the Ferguson Police Department. In 2012, after four years on the force, she won election to the city council, becoming one of the six-person body’s five white members. 

At a deposition, Ferguson’s former police chief revealed that his staff did not keep records of incidents in which officers used force against citizens, so long as no one died; in other words, there was no way of telling how often incidents like Davis’ happened. Surveillance video of the jail was destroyed before the trial.

"Hey, Media? Maybe instead of sending cameras to Robin Williams’ house to be ghoulish, you could send cameras to Ferguson to be journalists."
- Will Wheaton. (via mysharona1987)